Tell Trump: An artist’s view

I think the empowerment of ourselves and the sharing with each other and connecting to each other, that’s a greater statement to an incoming administration that would rather us be apart and separate.

Artist Ramiro Gomez was born in San Bernardino in 1986 to undocumented Mexican immigrant parents. His upbringing in Southern California and work as a nanny eventually led him to focus his artwork on immigration and the immigrant labor force in Los Angeles. He recently had his third show at the Charlie James Gallery last year in Chinatown.

When he asked what he would like to say to President Trump if he were given the chance, Gomez demurred, saying that he’d rather speak to those whom the president’s policies are likely to affect.=

Ramiro Gomez: I wouldn’t necessarily address him directly. I don’t feel the need to because the problems are there clear to see. You drive around the city here in LA and our disparity is extreme. This administration doesn’t feel the struggle. The administration around him have health care at the end of the day. They have the money, they have the support of whatever gives those the positions of power. I think the focus on others and taking the strength from focusing on him and empowering him and his ego is very important because otherwise there’s a demoralizing effect. And at the end of the day, where is the support for each other? That’s what I want to ask.

Because again, with all these things happening this week, and all my artwork and all the things I focus on, I think the empowerment of ourselves and the sharing with each other and connecting to each other, that’s a greater statement to an incoming administration that would rather us be apart and separate.